Thursday, May 21, 2020

Jane Austen s Northanger Abbey - 1920 Words

Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey is a novel that features vibrant character development but the biggest development is that which occurs in Catherine Morland. Catherine’s character nearly develops in all components of her being and she is able to evolve from the unorthodox â€Å"heroine† that she is initially described as. In the novel, Catherine starts out as an incredibly naà ¯ve and inexperienced girl who confuses all facets of the real world as the plot in a Gothic novel. Catherine develops as a character through her social interactions with those around her as it helps her gain experience with how to correctly perceive the world. With her newly gained experience of her surroundings, Catherine develops and is able to see the real world through a social lens rather than her own subjective lens or that of a Gothic lens. Catherine’s growth is evident in the very first line of the novel as it states â€Å"No one who had ever seen Catherine Morland in her infancy would have supposed her born to be an heroine. Her situation in life, the character of her father and mother, her own person and disposition, were all equally against her† (37). Catherine’s lowly heroine figure is made known instantly so that her development is much more apparent at the end of the novel. From the start of the novel Catherine is not a typical heroine, she is unorthodox in all facets of her life including the status of her parents. Catherine is initially also an incredibly naive character and this fuels herShow MoreRelatedGothic Elements:The Castle of Otranto by Walpole and a Scene in Jane Austens Northanger Abbey1334 Words   |  6 Pagestraditional gothic characters and parodies is not a new subject but a very interesting dynamic. I would like to discuss how one scene from the typical gothic novel, The C astle of Otranto by Horace Walpole, and a scene from Jane Austen’s parody of the gothic novel in Northanger Abbey contrast in many different ways to illustrate gothic tropes as well as Austen’s perspective view on the subject of the gothic through the use of, diction, setting, character and tone. The diction in each novel is very differentRead MoreJane Austen s Love With Love1104 Words   |  5 Pagesfew authors can grasp the pure essence of true love. Jane Austen is one of the select few romance genre geniuses, using slice-of-life situations and relatable people to create believable love stories. Although her happy life and close-knit family surely did not make her a tragic, starving writer, her own yearning for love, which she sadly never found, definitely gave her inspiration. Born on December 16, 1775 in Steventon, Hampshire, England, Jane was the second daughter and overall seventh childRead MoreJane Austen Writing Style Analysis1015 Words   |  5 Pages128J Dr. Fuson 21, October 2017 Jane Austen: It’s All About Style Jane Austen’s writing style is her own. She is a master at weaving dialogue and narration to create a compelling story. In her novel, Northanger Abbey, Austen showcases her skills as a word weaver to tell the story of her modified heroine, Catherine Morland. She also adds social commentary for the reader. She experiments with fiction in order to redefine the role of women in novels. In doing this, Austen directs her readers away fromRead More Catherine Morlands Coming of Age in Jane Austens Northanger Abbey1524 Words   |  7 PagesCatherine Morlands Coming of Age in Jane Austens Northanger Abbey Jane Austens intelligence and sophisticated diction made her a revolutionary author, and her mastery surpasses most modern authors. By challenging conventional stereotypes in her novels, she gives the open-minded reader a new perspective through the message she conveys. Her first novel, Northanger Abbey, focuses on reading. However, she parallels typical novel reading with the reading of people. Catherine Morlands comingRead MoreHeroic Ignorance And Gothic Novels By Jane Austen1490 Words   |  6 PagesHeroic Ignorance and Gothic Novels Jane Austen’s novel, Northanger Abbey, seeks to explore the effect of wealth on society. Throughout the novel, this portrayal of wealth assumes an increasingly critical tone, and is thus used to suggest the negative impact of financial goals in a relationship. This is shown in the contrast between Catherine’s relationship with Mr. Tilney, and Isabella’s promiscuous ways. In this dynamic, Catherine remains pure, engaged to a poor clergyman, whereas her friend IsabellaRead MoreSummary Of Their Walk 1009 Words   |  5 Pagesnovel on their walk, she thinks base off John Thorpe s saying, that Henry don’t read novels and because is not clever enough for them and gentlemen read better books (Austen, Chapter 14). After Henry clarifies he likes the book, Catherine changed her thought and expressed this, â€Å" I am very glad to hear it indeed, and now I shall never be ashamed of liking Udolpho myself. But I really thought before, young men despised novels amazi ngly.† (Austen, Chapter 14). These details from the novel describedRead MoreThe Social Fabric Of Late Eighteenth- And Early Nineteenth Century England2017 Words   |  9 Pages Jane Austen s novel is principally concerned with the social fabric of late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century England, a patriarchal society in which men held the economic and social power. In an often satirical portrait of the men and women attempting to gain a livelihood, Austen ironically points out faults in the system, raising questions about the values of English society and the power structure of the country. The novel is also engaged in an ideological debate that drives itsRead More Genteel People and Honest Hearts in Jane Austens Emma Essay examples1575 Words   |  7 PagesEmma:   Genteel People and Honest Hearts  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚     Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   In Emma, Jane Austen gives us ‘only the surface of the lives of genteel people’?   Though not necessarily a commonly used term today, the meaning of ‘genteel people’ is easily assumed. Good birth and breeding are not necessarily the only ‘qualities’ of genteel people: simple generosity, courtesy and elegance can also apply, as well as marriage into the class. The majority of the characters in Emma to some extent expand this definition to provideRead MoreEssay on Jane Austin and Pride Prejudice1457 Words   |  6 PagesJane Austin is currently known today as one of the women who first developed the ideas related to feminism (Abrams). Jane’s work became prevalent in English literature during time of transition from neo-classicism to romanticism (Abrams). She was influenced by a number of other literary figures of her time, and by the society in which she lived. Her writing sometimes reflected earlier writers, whom she s ometimes mocked because they always portrayed a perfect world in their writing and the world wasRead More Essay on Mr.Woodhouse and Miss Bates in Jane Austens Emma1648 Words   |  7 Pageslack of cant pleasant rather than overbearing. In the first part of the book, Miss Bates serves not only as the anti-snob, but also the anti-Emma. Whereas Emma is described at the outset as being handsome, clever, and rich, Miss Bates enjoy[s] a most uncommon degree of popularity for a woman neither young, handsome, rich, nor married. Nor, obviously, clever. Life has denied her everything that Emma has been granted; and how does Emma treat her, and speak of her to others? Shabbily, of course

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Finance - 5383 Words

FINANCE 2 ASSINGMENT 2011-2012 Nikesh Hindocha (10044607) Part A. Introduction As part of my assignment, I have been asked to discuss the following statement â€Å"Mergers and acquisitions can be value destroyers or value creators†. A merger can be defined as when two equal businesses in terms of profit margin and status, combine in order to become one legal entity. Initially, the fundamental reason for this merge is to produce a company that is worth more than the sum of its parts. An acquisition is where one company acquires a controlling interest in another company. The combination of these unequal companies can produce the same or even more benefits as a merger would. In different cases, these mergers and†¦show more content†¦Ã¢â‚¬Å"Building profitable businesses creates value. The board of directors and management’s primary responsibility is to increase company value and shareholder wealth. Shareholders invest in businesses seeking a significant return on their investment. They expect the reward to be appropriate for the business and financial risks of an unsure future. â€Å"Article: The Key to Creating Shareholder Value Knowledge Begins with Simple Cigar Box Accounting†)[2.]. The strategies and approaches employed by the company will help determine if the business has created value for the shareholder. In the case of Cadbury Schweppes, where the significant aim was to increase shareholder value, their primary aim is to focus on growth markets, improving brands and innovation in order to gain their objectives. (Source- annual report, 2000 Cadbury Schweppes) Value Destroyers Even though the fundamental objective for mergers and acquisitions is to create value, there may be factors involved that cause the value to be destroyed. It is believed that the prime component of why acquisitions fail is due to the fact that they paid too much to control it, which in turn leaves them with huge debts. The buyer may find that the premium they paid for the acquired company s shares (the so-called winner s curse) wipes out any gains made from the acquisition (Henry 2002). The differences in corporate culture play a substantial role in theShow MoreRelatedFinance1352 Words   |  6 Pagesfinancial manager differ from the traditional financial manager? Does the modern financial managers role differ for the large diversified firm and the small to medium size firm? The traditional financial manager was generally involved in the regular finance activities, e.g., banking operations, record keeping, management of the cash flow on a regular basis, and informing the funds requirements to the top management, etc. But, the role of financial manager has been enhanced in the todays environment;Read MoreFinance1074 Words   |  5 PagesCORPORATE FINANCE COURSE CORPORATE FINANCE 2.1 Working Capital Management Sept. 2014 Ir Frank W. van den Berg mba Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam ALYX Financial Consultancy bv, Aerdenhout FWvdB/2014 1 OUTLINE CORPORATE FINANCE FWvdB/2014 †¢Ã¢â‚¬ ¯ Basics Guiding principles †¢Ã¢â‚¬ ¯ Time value of money + Capital Budgeting †¢Ã¢â‚¬ ¯ Valuation of CF + Bonds †¢Ã¢â‚¬ ¯ Valuation of shares (+ co.’s) †¢Ã¢â‚¬ ¯ Financial Analysis (Ratios) †¢Ã¢â‚¬ ¯ Financial Planning (EFN) †¢Ã¢â‚¬ ¯ à  Ã¯Æ'   Working Cap. Mgt. (A/R,Read MoreThe Finance1054 Words   |  5 Pagesrequires intentional short-term and long-term planning. More importantly, in order for capital management to be deemed successful, it is required that all members of an organization are on board. â€Å"Capital budgeting is not only important to people in finance or accounting, it is essential to people throughout the business organization†lt; /spangt; (Block, Hirt, amp; Danielsen, 2011). As the duration of the investment period increases, and the size of investment increases, the residual risk also increasesRead MoreEquity Finance And Debt Finance823 Words   |  4 PagesStockholders are those entities who provide a company with the risk capital such as preference share owners and ordinary share owners (Freeman and Reed, 1983). Generally, stockholderis one of long-term finance providers with the aim to maximize their wealth.According toBrickleyet al. (1985), long-term finance provi ders are more likely to focus on the matter whether the financial structure in the company is sound or not and the durability of profitabilityrather than temporary profits that a potentiallyRead MoreFinance, Economics, And Finance Essay1245 Words   |  5 Pagesalso studied business, management, economics, and finance. These courses impressed upon me the importance of the financial sector in the economy. Finance professionals have the unique responsibility of managing assets and analyzing risks to ensure the future success of a company or organization. It is difficult to overstate the importance of this role, as the financial crisis of 2009 showed. It is due to my understanding of the importance of finance and investment, coupled with my longstanding interestRead MoreFinance : Finance A Carry Trade1144 Words   |  5 PagesIn finance a carry trade is a strategy that consists of borrowing at a low interest rate currency to fund investment in higher yielding currencies. (Moffett) Th e country in which the investors borrow from is called the funding country and the country where the investment occurs is called the target country. (4) Carry trade is also termed currency carry trade; this strategy is speculative in that the currency risk is present and not managed or hedged. (Moffett) Although there are several complicatedRead MoreFinance, Banking And Finance Industry2170 Words   |  9 Pagescomplete your transaction and move on with your day. The last thing on your mind is how that transaction is taking place. You don’t care what happens behind the scenes as long as your money is where it needs to be and is safe. As the banking and finance industry has transformed, so has the process of how your money is handled. To accompany those changes, regulators and lawmakers create laws designed to protect consumers, banks, and the economy as a whole. As you will learn, the history of the bankingRead MoreFinance : Finance A Carry Trade Essay1144 Words   |  5 Pages In finance a carry trade is a strategy that consists of borrowing at a low interest rate currency to fund investment in higher yielding currencies. (Moffett) The country in which the investors borrow from is called the funding country and the country where the investment occurs is called the target country. (4) Carry trade is also termed currency carry trade; this strategy is speculative in that the currency risk is present and not managed or hedged. (Moffett) Although there are several complicatedRead MoreFinance998 Words   |  4 PagesPlant Improvements Total Investments: total investment in plant and equipment brought forward from the Production spreadsheet. Sales of Plant and Equipment : total sales of plant and equipment brought foraad from the Production spreadsheet. Common Stock * Shares Outstanding: The number of shares of common stock in the hands of shareholders. Reflect any issue/ retire stock transaction at the beginning of this year * Price Per Share: stock price as of yesterday’s close. Stock will be issuedRead MoreInternal Sources Of Finance And Finance Essay2349 Words   |  10 PagesInternal sources of finance: Internal sources of finance are funds that arise from within the business such as profits as they can be retained to grow the finance and selling assets. Retained profit Retained profit is the money kept in the company after paying dividends. It is used to reinvest in the business or to pay debt. It comes by a business after it makes profit and is kept separate to use in other ways such as expanding the business by developing new buildings or certain areas, buying new

Reference Notes for Adobe Photoshop Free Essays

Restoring default preferences On the desktop, double-click the Adobe Photoshop icon to start Adobe Photoshop and then immediately hold down Ctrl-Alt-Shift (Windows) or Command-Option-Shift (Mac OS) to reset the default settings. Undoing multiple actions The Undo command (CONTOL + z) reverses only one step. However, you can still step back through multiple actions using the History palette. We will write a custom essay sample on Reference Notes for Adobe Photoshop or any similar topic only for you Order Now By default, the Photoshop History palette retains only the last 20 actions. You can change the number of levels in the History palette by choosing Edit gt; Preferences gt; GeneralYou can also use CONTROL + ALT + z to undo more than 1 action Tools †¢ The marquee tools make rectangular, elliptical, single row, and single column selections. †¢ The Move tool moves selections, layers, and guides. †¢ The lasso tools make freehand, polygonal (straightedge), and magnetic* (snap-to) selections. †¢ The Magic Wand tool selects similarly colored areas. †¢ The Crop tool trims images. †¢ The Slice tool creates slices. †¢ The Slice Select tool selects slices. †¢ The Healing Brush tool* paints with a sample or pattern to repair imperfections in an image. The Spot Healing Brush tool* quickly removes blemishes and imperfections from photographs with a uniform background.†¢ The Red Eye tool* removes red-eye in flash photos with one click. †¢ The Patch tool* repairs imperfections in a selected area of an image using a sample or pattern. †¢ The Color Replacement tool* substitutes one color for another. †¢ The Brush tool paints brush strokes. †¢ The Pencil tool paints hardedged strokes. †¢ The Clone Stamp tool paints with a sample of an image. †¢ The Pattern Stamp tool* paints with a part of an image as a pattern. The History Brush tool* paints a copy of the selected state or snapshot into the current image window. †¢ The Art History Brush tool* paints stylized strokes that simulate the look of different paint styles, using a selected state or snapshot. †¢ The Eraser tool erases pixels and restores parts of an image to a previously saved state.†¢ The Magic Eraser tool erases solid-colored areas to transparency with a single click. †¢ The Background Eraser tool* erases areas to transparency by dragging. †¢ The Gradient tool* creates straight-line, radial, angle, reflected, and diamond blends between colors. The Paint Bucket tool fills similarly colored areas with the foreground color. †¢ The Blur tool* blurs hard edges in an image. †¢ The Sharpen tool* sharpens soft edges in an image. †¢ The Smudge tool* smudges data in an image. †¢ The Dodge tool* lightens areas in an image. †¢ The Burn tool* darkens areas in an image. †¢ The Sponge tool* changes the color saturation of an area. †¢ The path selection tools* make shape or segment selections showing anchor points, direction lines, and direction points.†¢ The type tools create type on an image. †¢ The type mask tools* create a selection in the shape of type. The pen tools* draw smooth-edged paths. †¢ The Custom Shape tool* makes customized shapes selected from a custom shape list. †¢ The annotations tools* make notes and audio annotations that can be attached to an image. †¢ The Eyedropper tool samples colors in an image. †¢ The Sharpen tool* sharpens soft edges in an image. †¢ The Smudge tool* smudges data in an image. †¢ The Dodge tool* lightens areas in an image. †¢ The Burn tool* darkens areas in an image. †¢ The Sponge tool* changes the color saturation of an area. †¢ The path selection tools* make shape or segment selections showing anchor points, irection lines, and direction points. †¢ The type tools create type on an image. †¢ The type mask tools* create a selection in the shape of type. †¢ The pen tools* draw smooth-edged paths. †¢ The Custom Shape tool* makes customized shapes selected from a custom shape list. †¢ The annotations tools* make notes and audio annotations that can be attached to an image. †¢ The Eyedropper tool samples colors in an image. Using a context menu Context menus are short menus that are appropriate to specific elements in the work area. They are sometimes referred to as â€Å"right-click† or â€Å"shortcut† menus.Usually, the commands on a context menu are also available in some other area of the user interface, but using the context menu can save time. Palettes and palette locations Photoshop palettes are powerful and varied. You rarely would have a project in which you needed to see all palettes simultaneously. That’s why they’re in palette groups and why the default configurations leave some palettes unopened. The complete list of palettes appears on the Window menu, with check marks by the names of the palettes that are open at the front of their palette groups.You can open a closed palette or close an open one by selecting the palette name on the Window menu. You can hide all palettes at once—including the tool options bar and toolbox—by Pressing the Tab key. To reopen them, press Tab again. Expanding and collapsing palettes You can also resize a palette to see more or fewer of the available options it contains, either by dragging or clicking to toggle between preset sizes. †¢ To change the height of a palette, drag its lower right corner. †¢ To expand a palette to show as much as possible of its contents, click the minimize/ maximize button (Windows) or the zoom button (Mac OS).Click a second time to collapse the palette group. The toolbox and the tool options bar share some characteristics with the other palettes: You can drag the toolbox by its title bar to a different location in the work area. You can move the tool options bar to another location by dragging the grab bar at the far left end of the palette. You can hide the toolbox and tool options bar. However, there are other palette features that are not available or do not apply to the toolbox or tool options bar: You cannot group the toolbox or tool options bar with other palettes.You cannot resize the toolbox or tool options bar. You cannot dock the toolbox in the palette well. (The same is true for the tool options bar, because the palette well appears on the tool options bar. ) The toolbox and tool options bar do not have palette menus. You can drag the toolbox by its title bar to a different location in the work area. You can move the tool options bar to another location by dragging the grab bar at the far left end of the palette. You can hide the toolbox and tool options bar.However, there are other palette features that are not available or do not apply to the toolbox or tool options bar: You cannot group the toolbox or tool options bar with other palettes. You cannot resize the toolbox or tool options bar. You cannot dock the toolbox in the palette well. (The same is true for the tool options bar, because the palette well appears on the tool options bar. ) The toolbox and tool options bar do not have palette menus. Customizing the workspace Choose Window gt; Workspace gt; select the appropriate selection Crop ToolUse the Crop tool to crop images. Select perspective to manipulate the boundaries of the crop area You can crop outside of the canvas to make a larger image Painting with the Spot Healing Brush The Spot Healing Brush tool quickly removes blemishes and other imperfections from photos. It works similarly to the Healing Brush: It paints with sampled pixels from an image or pattern and matches the texture, lighting, transparency, and shading of the sampled pixels to the pixels being healed. Selecting parts of an image Shift adds to the selection Alt subtracts from the selectionLayer Masks Create transparency without being destructive. Click on the layer mask icon in the layers palette and paint black and white to create transparency Quick masks In Adobe Photoshop, you can make temporary masks, called quick masks, or you can create permanent masks and store them as special grayscale channels called alpha channels. Photoshop also uses channels to store an image’s color information and information about spot color. Unlike layers, channels do not print. You use the Channels palette to view and work with alpha channels. Creating a quick maskClick the Quick Mask mode button in the toolbox. (By default, you have been working in Standard mode. ) In Quick Mask mode, a red overlay appears, masking and protecting the area outside the selection the way rubylith, or red acetate, masked images in traditional print shops. You can apply changes only to the unprotected area that is visible and selected. Note: A partial selection must exist to see the overlay in Quick Mask mode. Creating an adjustment layer Adjustment layers can be added to an image to apply color and tonal adjustments without permanently changing the pixel values in the image.For example, if you add a Color Balance adjustment layer to an image, you can experiment with different colors repeatedly, because the change occurs only on the adjustment layer. If you decide to return to the original pixel values, you can hide or delete the adjustment layer. Adjustment layers affect all of the layers below it. Layer styles Layer styles are automated special effects that you can apply to a layer. In the Layer Style dialog box, make sure that the Preview check box is selected, or select it now so that you’ll be able to see the changes as you work.Examine the options for Drop Shadow in the Layer Style dialog box. You can either leave them at the default settings, or experiment with various changes until you like the results you see in the image window. To copy a selection or a layer Use the move tool while pressing the ALT key to make a copy of the selection or the layer Typographic Design When you add type to an image in Photoshop, the characters are composed of pixels and have the same resolution as the image file—zooming in on characters shows jagged edges.However, Photoshop preserves the vector-based type outlines and uses them when you scale or resize type, save a PDF or EPS file, or print the image to a PostScript printer. As a result, you can produce type with crisp, res olution-independent edges, apply effects and styles to type, and transform its shape and size. Type tool tricks †¢ Shift-click in the image window with the Type tool (T) to create a new type layer—in case you’re close to another block of type and Photoshop tries to auto select it. Double-click the T thumbnail icon on any text layer in the Layers palette to select all of the type on that layer. †¢ With any text selected right-click (Windows) or Control-click (Mac OS) on the text to access the contextual menu. Choose Check Spelling to run a spell check. †¢ Text on a path – create a path – select the type tool and bring the tool close to the path. When the tool changes appearance, start typing! Your text will be on the path!! Warping a layer Use the free transform tool (CONTROL + t) and select the warp icon to add curves to your selection How to cite Reference Notes for Adobe Photoshop, Papers

Friday, April 24, 2020

Ode On Grecian Urn Essays - Literature, Poetry, British Poetry

Ode On Grecian Urn Imagine the following: a bride dressed in white on her wedding day, savage men chasing after women, the lingering subject of love, or a peaceful, uncorrupted town. What do these topics have in common? Through the use of these topics, John Keats portrays the theme of eternal innocence and the sufficiency of beauty throughout his poem, "Ode on a Grecian Urn." In the first stanza of the poem which has a rhyme scheme of ababcdedce, Keats introduces the theme of eternal innocence and the sufficiency of beauty with reference to the "unravished bride of quietness." Accepting her purity of not yet engaging in the sexual actions of marriage, the urn portrays the bride in this state, and she will remain like so forever. Also in the first stanza, Keats uses the literary technique of cacophony to describe savage men chasing women into the dark, mysterious, and savage woods. Some of the cacophonic words include "thy, Arcady, and ecstasy." Using these words, Keats makes the urn capture the picture of the chase before any sexual desires or intentions are fulfilled. Since the urn ceases to describe anything past the chase itself, the situation is purely innocent with beauty thus complying with the theme. Also evident throughout the second and third stanzas is the theme of eternal innocence and beauty. Keats writes of a young man sitting under a tree with the girl whom he loves. He is playing a pan flute to the girl expressing his passion for her through music. Once captured by Story2 the urn, the picture will remain like so forever. The trees with the leaves, the maiden, and the young man himself will always remain the same. He will always play the flute and can never kiss the girl. Keats uses the following lines in this stanza: "She cannot fade, though thou hast not thy bliss, / For ever wilt thou love, and she be fair!" These lines simply mean that the boy doesn't have the bliss of the kiss; but the poet says not to worry because the young maiden will always be remain by his side, young and beautiful. The urn captures her innocence. Therefore, since the maiden and the young man never actually have a sexual contact relationship, their love is pure, innocent, and eternal thus complying with the theme of eternal innocence and beauty. Continuing to the fourth stanza, the theme of eternal innocence and beauty is profound with the subject of a peaceful, uncorrupted town. The urn presents a priest leading a heifer dressed in garland up to an altar. The people from the town are on their way to the altar. The town symbolizes the potential of man (cheating, lying, pride, and envy). Then, as the story continues, a bit of irony becomes present. The people are portrayed to have taken over a spiritual nature of innocence and purity. They are spiritual in nature as depicted by the urn; but not even five minutes later, they plan to sacrifice the heifer. But, once again, by freezing in time the picture of innocence, the urn does not represent the corrupted image that is about to take place. It has caught the people in a holy moment, and it has caught the town as an empty picture of beauty. Therefore, Keats once again demonstrates eternal innocence and beauty by capturing on the urn the picture of an uncorrupted town and a group of holy people. In the last stanza, Keats tells the reader he has teased their thought by convincing that the theme of innocence and beauty are ever present in society. This last stanza leaves the reader with mixed emotions as a result of the mixed imagery. This means that the narrator voices Story3 protests of the superiority of the world captured in the Arcadian scenes (first stanza), but is perplexed by the unanswered questions stemming from the silence of the "Cold Pastoral" in the last stanza. He is primarily trying to tease the thought process by making the reader think of something eternal. Also adding to the confusion is the most famous part of the poem that lies within the couplet at the conclusion of the ode. Keats metaphorically penned these lines: "Beauty is truth, truth beauty,--that is all/ Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know." It is said that even Keats was not clear of the exact message presented by this statement. Most critics think he used the terms of truth and beauty in a Platonic sense, as verbal representations of

Tuesday, March 17, 2020

The Politics essays

The Politics essays In the book The Politics, Aristotle analyzes different types of political communities. He examines these political communities on two different levels; first as a city and then as a regime. By studying both city and regime you get the full picture of the different types of governments throughout the world. Aristotle uses this dual approach to describe the different types of regimes. Through his evaluation of the city and regime, Aristotle comes to the conclusion that oligarchies, which are governments that are ruled by the few, are deviant regimes because they govern for the good of the rulers, and not for the good of the whole. The city is the first level that Aristotle uses to evaluate different types of political communities. A complete city is the multitude of such persons that is adequate with a view to a self-sufficient life (Aristotle pg. 87). Villages are collaboration of many households that have come together so they can obtain non-daily needs. Since villages are not self-sufficient, they join together to form cities. Cities provide you with the things your household and your village are not able to provide to you. Therefore, the city is the only thing that can exists self-sufficiently, and it exists for the sake of living well. The city is also the most authoritative partnership. The city embraces all other partnerships and therefore, it aims at the most authoritative good of all, which is living well. Aristotle uses city to generally describe political communities. The city only describes the people who inhabit it; it does not distinguish who the rulers are or what kind of rule the city has. The citizens are an important aspect of political communities because knowing the citizens allows you to investigate what type of regime that particular city has or should have. To find out who rules the city you have to study the citys regime. Regimes are the second level of analy...

Sunday, March 1, 2020

The Differences Between Rack and Wrack

The Differences Between Rack and Wrack As Jeremy Butterfield points out: The relationship between the forms rack and wrack is complicated, and the spellings are sometimes interchangeable (Oxford A-Z of English Usage, 2013). Definitions Rack and Wrack as VerbsAs a verb, rack means to torture or cause great suffering, or to place (something) in or on a rack. The verb wrack  means to wreck or cause the ruin of something. Rack  and  Wrack  as NounsAs a  noun,  rack means a frame, a shelf, an instrument of torture, or a state of intense anguish. The noun wrack means destruction or wreckage. Idiomatically, we may rack the billiard balls, rack up points, and roast a rack of lamb. But when it comes to nerve-(w)racking experiences or (w)racking our brains, most writers, dictionaries, and usage guides admit to being (w)racked with uncertainty. See the (sometimes contradictory) usage notes below. Examples One  bicycle, rusted as if  it had been there for years, leaned in the rack, its fenders supporting crescents of white. (John Updike, Flight.  The Early Stories: 1953-1975. Knopf,  2003)To delight in seeing men stabbed, poisoned, racked, or impaled is certainly the sign of a cruel temper. (Joseph Addison, The Spectator, April 20, 1711)I have sometimes been wildly, despairingly, acutely miserable, racked with sorrow, but through it all, I still know quite certainly that just to be alive is a grand thing. (Agatha Christie, An Autobiography, 1977)Penny was wracked with sorrow for his friends. His face was strained. (Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, The Yearling, 1938)There is a half-filled baby bottle on the cupboard shelf. She picks it up. The babys cry is becoming nerve-wracking. (Paddy Chayefsky, The Goddess, 1958)But having to be present for merchandise deliveries that Eunice ordered online or on the phone was nerve-racking. (Joseph Wambaugh, Hollywood Moon, 2009)Lud had been going to wrack and ruin for centuries. (Stephen King, Wizard, and Glass, 1997) Usage Notes and Idiom Alerts Rack and wrack are confused so frequently that most dictionaries now list both spellings for the verb meaning torment and the noun meaning destruction. (Margery Fee and Janice McAlpine, Guide to Canadian English Usage, 2nd ed. Oxford University Press, 2007) Idioms and Variant Spellings In some senses, the verbs rack and wrack are synonymous, and the two words, each as either noun or verb, are nearly interchangeable at some points. The usage problems arise over which spelling to use where there seems to be a possible or a clear overlap in meaning. Most Edited English will prefer to rack your brain, wrack and ruin, storm-wracked, and pain-wracked, but other Standard written evidence, including some Edited English, will use the variant spelling for each. (Kenneth G. Wilson, The Columbia Guide to Standard American English. Columbia University Press, 1993) (W)rack and Ruin The expression (w)rack and ruin preserves the original sense of destruction. (These days rack, and ruin is the more common spelling in both British and American English, by the evidence of the BNC and CCAE.)...As often, figurative uses of rack and wrack have enlarged their domains and made the spelling interchangeable wherever the sense of severe stress and destruction apply. Wrack seems to be gaining ground there, although still less common than rack in collocations such as nerve-racking and racking ones brains. (Pam Peters, The Cambridge Guide to English Usage. Cambridge University Press, 2004) Nerve-Racking Wrack is commonly used as a verb synonymous with the figurative senses of rack...Probably the most sensible attitude would be to ignore the etymologies of rack and wrack (which, of course, is exactly what most people do) and regard them simply as spelling variants of one word. If you choose to toe the line drawn by the commentators, however, you will want to write nerve-racking, rack ones brains, storm-wracked, and for good measure wrack and ruin. Then you will have nothing to worry about being criticized for- except, of course, for using too many clichà ©s. (Merriam-Websters Dictionary of English Usage, Merriam-Webster, 1994) Rack em Up The New York Times Manual of Style and Usage has a great idea here: Never use wrack, because it confuses people. Instead, when wrack means wreck, just use wreck. (But when you mean inflict damage, spell it wreak. You wreak havoc on; you never wreck havoc because havoc is unwreckable.)O.K., keynoters, lets rack em up: Its traditional to rack up your opponent with a good tongue-lashing for having led the country to wrack and ruin, and after you rack up a victory, you can wreak patronage vengeance from high atop your city on a hill. (William Safire, Quoth the Maven: More on Language from William Safire. Random House, 1993) Wracked With Doubt The noun rack applies to various types of framework; the verb rack means to arrange on a rack, to torture, trouble, or torment: He was placed on the rack. She racked her brain....The noun wrack  means ruin or destruction, as in wrack and ruin and wracked with pain. Also nerve-wracking....The verb wrack has substantially the same meaning as the verb rack, the latter being preferred. (The Associated Press Stylebook and Briefing on Media Law 2011. Associated Press, 2015) Practice He placed his trunk in the luggage _____ and took a seat by the window.The bridge had fallen into _____ and ruin. Answers to Practice Exercises Answers to Practice Exercises: Rack and Wrack He placed his trunk in the luggage rack and took a seat by the window.The bridge had fallen into (w)rack and ruin.

Friday, February 14, 2020

Online education Assignment Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 250 words

Online education - Assignment Example Strategies like this can directly influence learning process and enhance it for the better. Though online education with the help of modern modes of technology translates into less student-teacher interaction, but the truth is that the merits of this mode of education far outweigh its demerits. Out of all teachers and students interviewed during the course of this research, majority coincided with online education giving logical reasons to augment their approval. It is a well-established scientific fact that some students are right brain dominant, while others are left brain dominant. While verbal lectures among other conventional teaching methods are more suitable for left brain dominant students, right brain dominant students learn better through videos. The conclusion is that though online education is quite beneficial, real learning process should be a mix of both conventional and modern teaching methods because student-teacher interaction cannot be substituted by anything